Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Dissent saves lives

Richard Cohen on Iraq, in The Washington Post:

Back when Hugh Shelton was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he sent all 17 of his four-star generals "Dereliction of Duty" by H.R. McMaster and asked them to a Pentagon breakfast to discuss the book with the author. The book charges that the U.S. military was derelict in its duty by meekly allowing duplicitous and inept civilians from the president on down to lead the nation into a war (Vietnam) that it then fought unsuccessfully. Shelton vowed that this would not happen again. ...

The war in Iraq has been likened to Vietnam. Certainly, it has opened the same credibility gap, has been funded by deficit spending and has turned into a quagmire. Maybe, though, this sense of deja vu is felt most keenly at the Pentagon. Within that building, it must be Vietnam all over again -- another asinine strategy, another duplicitous civilian leadership, more conformity and careerism, and, of course, more unnecessary loss of life.

Donald Rumsfeld famously came to the Pentagon to reform it. Instead, as we are coming to realize, he broke it, and H.R. McMaster, now a colonel with Iraq service, has at least one more book in him. Unfortunately, he can use the same title.

1 Comments:

At 4/11/2006 01:51:00 PM, Blogger servant said...

What's really painful me is that the author of the Powell Doctrine went along to get along.

Colon is the one who has fallen the farthest in terms of protecting the military from predatory incompetent civilians.

Wilkerson's Cheney Rumsfeld cabal. They burned the Powell Doctrine and smoked the ashes on the neo-con alter of Bal.

 

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